TOP 5 BEST CAMPING DUTCH OVEN

Sitting with your family near the fire, Cook some great meal using many different ingredients is one of the best experiences I remember as a child. In this compassion, we tested every one of this wonderful ovens in order to help you find the best one for you according to different measurements.

Here are the results:


 
RANK PRODUCT DESCRIPTION SIZES RATING PRICE
1 top-5-best-camping-dutch-ovens-01

LODGE DEEP CAMP DUTCH OVEN

The Lodge Deep Camp Dutch oven offers durability and value for a lifetime of camping and open fire cooking. Read review

 
5qt, 8qt (20.3 pounds), 10qt 10
2 top-5-best-camping-dutch-ovens-012

CAMP CHEF DELUXE DUTCH OVEN

The Camp Chef Deluxe Dutch Oven is one of the best camp dutch ovens on the market today. It offers all of the features that you need in a camp dutch oven. Read review

12qt 9.9
3 top-5-best-camping-dutch-ovens-013

LODGE CAMP DUTCH OVEN

The Lodge Camp Dutch Oven is an inexpensive cast iron camp dutch oven that offers a lifetime of versatility and great meals for your family. Read review

6qt 9.8
4 top-5-best-camping-dutch-ovens-014 GSI OUTDOOR HARD ANODIZED DUTCH OVEN

Camp cooking has never been easier than with the GSI Outdoor Hard Anodized Dutch Oven. The GSI Outdoor Hard Anodized Dutch Oven makes cleanup a breeze. Read review

10qt, 12qt, 14qt

9.6

5 top-5-best-camping-dutch-ovens-015

TEXSPORT CAST IRON DUTCH OVEN

The Texsport Cast Iron Dutch Oven offers the compact versatility that you need in a camping dutch oven. It is the perfect camping dutch oven to feed 4 to 6. Read review

4qt 10

HOW WE CHOSE

We tested a large number of ovens before building our list. Our final ranking is based on price, quality, brand, popularity, online reviews, ease of care, longevity, and most importantly, our experience with them in the kitchen.

MATERIALS DUTCH OVENS ARE MADE FROM

Dutch ovens are made from one of two materials: aluminum and cast iron. The majority of people who use dutch ovens on a regular basis prefer cast iron because it is more durable, distributes and retains heat much better, and is easier to cook with.

Aluminum does have its advantages. First, it is lightweight; a great plus if you are hiking into an outdoor adventure. Additionally, aluminum will not rust and can be easier to clean than cast iron.

PHYSICAL FEATURES OF A DUTCH OVEN

You may think that a dutch oven is a simple pot; you cook in it and never think very seriously about it. Nothing could be further from the truth. There are many physical characteristics of a dutch oven to be aware of. These include:

Oven Body: Cast iron dutch ovens are thick and heavy. During casting ovens may develop some slight imperfections, but the sides need to be of a nearly uniform thickness. If there is a large difference in the thickness, the kettle will have hot and cold spots. These will cause food to cook unevenly and the kettle will eventually crack.

Lid: When Dutch ovens were used to cook over the fire, the lid simply needed to be large enough to keep coals and embers out of the pot. Today, the lid of a french oven must be able to divert condensation back to the food for self-basting and to keep food moist. Some models have lids that seal so tightly that you can bake bread in them.

Coating: Modern Dutch ovens often have an enamel coating to further refine heat distribution, make them easier to clean, and help the ovens fit into any décor. You will want an oven that has at least two coats of enamel. The only caution with an enamel coated oven is that, while they are dishwasher safe, the enamel can fade if you wash the pot in the dishwasher exclusively. Occasional hand-washing with a mild soap will help the enamel remain shiny for years to come.

All of the products that we recommend are made by companies that are known to create products that are free from defects. The enameled ovens all have at least two layers of enamel for added shine and longevity.

SEASONING A DUTCH OVEN

Many manufacturers sell their non-enameled dutch ovens pre-seasoned; however, that seasoning will wear off after a few uses, so you need to be able to reapply it. It is a simple, yet time-consuming process. The oven must be clean and rust-free prior to seasoning. You need to coat the interior of the oven with a thin layer of shortening or oil, then slowly bake it into the metal at about 300 degrees. It could take up to an hour, but remove the oven as soon as the interior of the oven appears to be dry.

FAQ

We would enjoy answering any questions that you might have involving the dutch ovens or french ovens that are reviewed on this website. Send us an email or ask it in the comment section.

Below you can find a few frequently asked questions about dutch ovens followed by the corresponding answers.

What is a dutch oven ?

Cook all greater than the entire world use Dutch ovens, but you do not must be a professional chief cook to use one of these damaging males.

You just should be passionate about foodstuff, and to discover all the factors Dutch ovens are great for. Just one of them may be the well-being facet of dishes made of cast iron. They aren’t sensitive to chipping, so you may readily stir them with metal products, unlike aluminum or Teflon recipes. Even if you do get some of the iron in your food, know that it is healthy and that you simply quite possibly do not get the ample intake of iron in your dinners daily. Read more

HOW DO YOU SEASON A DUTCH OVEN?

First off, only bare metal cast iron dutch ovens need to be seasoned. An enamel coated oven will never need seasoning. Seasoning a dutch oven is very simple and only needs to take a short time out of your day. Here are the steps to follow:

  • Wash, rinse, and completely dry your oven.
  • Lightly grease the inside with solid shortening, e.g. Crisco
  • Bake at 300 degrees in a conventional oven for one hour. You will want to turn off your smoke alarms and open the windows because the shortening is going to smoke as it is baked into the surface of the oven.
  • Allow your oven to cool completely, then remove any excess shortening. You may want to store your Dutch oven with a paper towel hanging out between the lid and the pot. The edges of the paper towel should be touching the bottom of the oven in order to soak up any excess shortening that is left.
  • After seasoning, avoid using soap to wash your oven. Soap will remove the seasoning and you will have to repeat the process. Also, if rust appears on your dutch oven, you will need to season it again.

IF I CAN’T USE DISH SOAP TO CLEAN MY OVEN, HOW DO I CLEAN IT?

Use a plastic scraper or scouring pad to remove excess food…metal will damage the oven.

After excess food is removed, wash with a soft cloth and warm water. When clean, rinse with warm water.

Completely dry your oven with a paper towel or over a heat source.

If the oven is fairly new, wipe a thin coating of cooking oil all over the interior of the oven. Wipe excess oil off, then store your oven in a dry place with a paper towel touching the bottom and sticking out between the lid and the kettle.

Read moreHow To Cleaning And Care For Your Dutch Oven